Nutrition

Foods to Eat to Help Depression

Many have heard the question posed what came first, the chicken or the egg? But how does that concept apply to depression? It’s well-known that when we’re depressed, our motivation and interest in maintaining a healthy and balanced diet subsides in the same way our energy does. Harvard Medical Students positioned that same question in relation to depression; what came first, depression or a poor diet? continue reading »

Food Color and Nutrition

In Chinese medical theory, food is considered medicine. Food has qualities and functions biochemically and energetically that target specific organs. Not only that, but the action a particular food takes to benefit that organ in terms of taste, color and temperature is what is included in Five Element theory. Food has a relationship to both the natural elements as well as the organs in the body and balances the elements of fire, earth, metal, water and wood to healthy, generating cycles. continue reading »

Walnuts and Your Brain

by Toni Twitty, M.Ac., Ph.D.c 

Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture OKC Expert

 

Many people like to add walnuts to food to add some zest and a little crunchy kick, but walnuts are much more than a flavor additive, as they are chock full of healthy properties and have been used in Asia as an overall health tonic and brain booster for years. Let’s take a nutty look at walnuts.    

Walnuts, otherwise known as Hu Tao Ren in Chinese medicine, are used as a kind of herbal remedy. In Chinese medicine, they look at the quality, temperature, flavor and color of a food to uncover certain elements that are beneficial to those who need to balance those qualities in their body. For example, the walnut is classified as “warming”. Warming foods tend to improve circulation and raise what is known as the yang qi. The yang is what is energetic, bright, outward, hot and moving (as opposed to yin, which is more inward, dark, still, cool and moist). Warming food is used in cold conditions; for example, if your stomach is cold from an overabundance of cool foods, you may have some digestive issues like gas and bloating due to slower digestion. In addition, the walnut is lubricating, moist and a bit greasy. This quality is helpful for lubricating the intestines and helping digestion and constipation.

In Chinese medicine, the element of the food goes to certain organs and is beneficial for them; walnuts are said to benefit the lungs, large intestine and the kidneys specifically. Walnuts strengthen the lungs to help chronic cough, asthma and skin conditions (which are connected to the lung, according the Chinese medical principles). Walnuts also are a kidney tonic and help urination; in addition, kidneys are said to influence libido, fertility, the back and knees and the aging process. Walnuts have been used to help libido and fertility, a 2012 study in Asia showed males who consumed walnuts had improved sperm quality. In addition, walnuts are used for insomnia. They help raise serotonin levels, which promote feelings of well being and help people sleep better. Finally, in looking at food as medicine, foods that resemble a body part often treat that organ. What does the walnut resemble? Two lobes of the brain, the left and right hemisphere. It is commonly known that walnuts are an excellent brain food.    

Walnuts have been shown to have high levels of Omega-3, which is an essential fatty acid that helps brain and heart function. Walnuts are anti-inflammatory, have antioxidants and recent research has shown they may have anti-cancer properties and help diabetes due to beneficial fats. In addition, they have vitamin E, a powerful antioxidant, minerals and B vitamins. Walnuts help digestion and give a feeling of being full, so they aid in weight loss.   

It should be noted that in Chinese medicine, most food recommended for health is used in a formula that is unique for you and an overall treatment plan is created. Walnuts are not a panacea for health care, and it’s best not to self-diagnose; instead, visit an acupuncture provider to get a thorough diagnosis and a balanced formula right for you.

Walnuts are not recommended in cases of fever, diarrhea or allergic reaction to nuts. If you are generally healthy and want a nice tonic, add a nice handful of nuts to not only perk up your food but also your body.

 

acupuncture okcDr. Toni Twitty, owner of Be Well Acupuncture OKC in Oklahoma City, OK is an expert Acupuncturist. She specializes in resolving pain, treating chronic conditions, general wellness, and fertility. Learn more about Toni and get started on your road to better health at: www.bewellokc.com

Parmesan Squash Rounds

squash recipe

by Toni Twitty, M.Ac., Ph.D.c 

Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture OKC Expert

August 2, 2018

 

You. Guys. Squash is great for the spleen, which means its great for digestion this time of year and its also in season! I feel that like means squash is everything in late summer. I was searching for some kid-pleasing recipes to use up our abundance (also a theme in late summer) of squash and something magic happened when I came across this one. This recipe is life! Enjoy!

 

 

acupuncture okc

 

Dr. Toni Twitty, owner of Be Well Acupuncture OKC in Edmond, OK is an highly respected expert Acupuncturist. She specializes in resolving pain, treating chronic conditions, and fertility. Learn more about Toni and get started on your road to better health at: www.bewellokc.com

 

 

Chew On This: Digestion and the Spleen

acupuncture okcby Toni Twitty, M.Ac., Ph.D.c 

Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture OKC Expert

August 2, 2018

 

The Spleen and Stomach rule the late summer season. That means these organs most active, accessible, and unfortunately prone to problems RIGHT NOW. They are also associated with the “Earth” element. Earth provides support and nourishment for all life. Likewise, these active organs provide the body with nourishment through what we eat. Food is ingested, digested, transformed, transported, and assimilated into the physical body, creating bone, muscle, energy, and blood. Literally we are what we eat!

The health of these organs is critical to our feeling well. Digestive troubles plague modern society. Check out your local drugstore and you’ll find an entire isle dedicated to items designed to suppress various symptoms of poor digestive health- probiotics, antacids, antiemetics, Pepto… The only problem is that they DON’T get at the root cause of the problem. They are a bandaid. 

Over time, a poor diet coupled with irregular eating habits, over-concentration, worry, excessive studying, or sitting too long can injure our Spleen and Stomach. Adopting a few new eating habits may allow your digestion to function better. In turn, the health of your entire being may improve. Caring for your health, naturally, with acupuncture and Chinese medicine can help get to the root cause of digestive troubles as well as other problems that you are experiencing.

 

So. How is Your Spleen Doing?

 

Below are a few symptoms that appear when a Spleen/Stomach disharmony is present:

 

•Abdominal distention, bloating, aches or pain
• Flatulence after meals or with stress
• Watery, loose stools, or diarrhea
• Blood or excessive mucus in stools
• Bruising easily
• Nausea, vomiting, or lack of appetite
• Sallow complexion or pale lips
• Pale and swollen tongue
• Weakness and heaviness in the arms, legs, or muscles
• Fatigue, lethargy, or low energy
• Dizziness or history of anemia
• Susceptibility to colds and flu
• Cold hands and feet

• Difficulty Concentrating

• Infertility 

 

If you said yes to a few of these, Give us a call at 405-693-5121 or schedule online to get started towards better digestive health today!

 

 

Bon Appetite and enjoy the rest of your summer!

 

acupuncture okc

Dr. Toni Twitty, owner of Be Well Acupuncture OKC in Oklahoma City, OK is an expert Acupuncturist. She specializes in resolving pain, treating chronic conditions, general wellness, and fertility. Learn more about Toni and get started on your road to better health at: www.bewellokc.com